The Coconut Oil Myth – Separating Fact from Fiction

5/2/16

dog-and-coconut

Have you heard of all the magic associated with the addition of coconut oil to your pet’s food?  We know that many people are looking for alternative options to process pet foods.  Unfortunately, much of the hype and misinformation you hear and read will lead you to a diet that is not nutritionally balanced.

Let’s talk about the hype regarding coconut oil.  Television celebrity Dr. Oz has been cheerleading the wonders of coconut oil.  Remember the green coffee bean debacle?  Not everything he promotes is true.  According to Dr. Ken Tudor of PetMD, Dr. Oz claims coconut oil “cures bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, promotes weight loss, promotes ‘good cholesterol,’ and improves the mental skills of Alzheimer’s patients. He stops short of coconut oil getting rid of unwanted facial hair and unwanted house guests, but the implication is that anything is possible.”

Does it sound too good to be true?  You bet.  We recommend that coconut oil not be used as the sole source of fat in a pet’s homemade dog food diets or added to commercial dog food. Why?

Separating fact from fiction about the wonders of coconut oil

Does not provide daily fat requirements for dogs

According to Dr. Tudor, “To meet the daily fat needs of dogs, every 1,000 calories (kilocalories, actually) needs to contain 2,700 mg of the omega-6 fat called linoleic acid, and 107 mg of the omega-3 fat called alpha-linolenic acid. Coconut oil contains only 243 mg of an undifferentiated form of linoleic acid (omega 6).”  Dogs and cats are not capable of efficiently converting omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids.  In other words, coconut oil as a sole source of fat in your dog’s diet will be deficient in what he/she needs in regards to essential fatty acids.

Does not protect against bacteria,viruses, or fungi.

Coconut oil contains lauric acid, which has been shown to kill some bacteria, viruses, and fungi in laboratory experiments.  However, the amount needed to kill germs in laboratory culture dishes is greater than can be consumed.  Research has NOT shown that coconut oil protects humans or animals from infection at normal amounts of consumption.

It also raises the blood levels of “bad cholesterol.”

In addition to raising the levels of HDLs, or “good cholesterol,” in the blood, coconut oil also increases the blood levels of LDLs, or “bad cholesterol.” Fortunately this is not a problem for pets since cholesterol is not a factor in their heart disease.

Does not improve congnitive function

According to Dr. Tudor, “Geriatric cognitive disorders, or dementia, are very similar to Alzheimer’s and are real disorders in pets. That cat that howls for no reason at night or the dog that stares at the wall and seems confused are suffering from an Alzheimer’s-like brain change.”  Some human Alzheimer’s patients have shown improved mental function after adding coconut oil to their diets.  However, there are no evidence-based studies that show that coconut oil positively impacts degenerative brain function in pets.

The bottom line is that coconut oil adds 120 calories for every tablespoon without adding any appreciable nutritional value. Adding it to a commercial diet is adding unneeded fat calories, much like an unnecessary treat. And it is certainly a recipe for fat malnutrition for those using it exclusively in their pets’ homemade diets.

Source:  http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/july/coconut-oil-over-hyped-super-food-pets-32910

 

Xylitol More Toxic to Dogs than Chocolate

1479743596All of us here at Family Pet Animal Hospital want to continue to warn pet owners about the dangers of xylitol, an increasingly popular sugar-substitute that is highly toxic to dogs. Xylitol can be found in many common products from sugar-free gum, mints, mouthwash, toothpaste, gummy vitamins, over-the-counter supplements, and various food products. Unsurprisingly, given the increasing presence of xylitol, the Pet Poison Helpline recently reported a dramatic increase in the number of phone calls they have received regarding xylitol poisoning.

What products contain Xylitol?

Alarmingly, multiple peanut and other nut butter brands have started using xylitol. How many of us use peanut butter as a medication vessel or treat for our dogs? A lot! According to the Veterinary Information Network News Service, the following five companies add xylitol to their peanut butter products – Go Nuts, Hand’s Protein Plus Peanut Butter, Krush Nutrition, Nuts ‘n More and P28.

Be sure to check labels carefully for xylitol. According to Dr. Tina Wismer at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, pet owners should be on the lookout for xylitol and the other names it may appear as: 1,4-anhydro-d-xylitol, anhydroxylitol, birch bark extract, birch sugar, d-xylitol, xylite, xdylitylglucoside, and Zylatol.

100x More Toxic Than Chocolate

Almost everyone knows that chocolate is toxic to dogs, but few people know xylitol is estimated to be 100x more toxic than chocolate to dogs. While xylitol is a naturally occurring sweetener that is safe for people, ingestion by a dog of >0.1 gm/kg can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia within 10-15 minutes. Ingestion of larger quantities can even cause liver necrosis and liver failure. Signs of xylitol poisoning include weakness, depression, lethargy, vomiting, tremors, seizures, acute collapse, jaundice, diarrhea, black-tarry stools, bruising and death.

If You Suspect Xylitol Poisoning

Be sure to keep all these foods/products out of your dog’s reach. If you suspect xylitol ingestion, contact your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Helpline (855.764.7661 – a $49/incident fee applies) immediately for potentially life-saving recommendations. Be sure to have the product packaging handy during the call(s) and bring it to your veterinarian to assist with determining the amount ingested by your pet. Treatment may require hospitalization and will usually include IV fluids, sugar supplementation, monitoring of blood sugar and liver values, and the use of liver protective drugs.

Call for Foster Homes with Feline Panleukopenia (Feline Distemper) Outbreak at Local Shelter

5/5/15

You may have heard that there is a current outbreak of feline panleukopenia, also known as feline distemper, at Chicago Animal Care & Control. Feline panluekopenia is a highly contagious virus that attacks and destroys white blood cells, weakening the immune system and puts the cat at a greater risk of contracting secondary infections. We believe that there is minimal risk to the vast majority of our feline patients, but wanted everyone to be aware of the situation, especially anyone bringing home a new cat from a shelter or rescuing a stray.

Symptoms often include depression and extreme lethargy, lack of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. The virus is shed in feces or vomit of an infected cat. Others can be exposed by sniffing or licking the vomit or feces or surfaces that have been contaminated.

Kittens are the most susceptible to the virus, although it can strike cats at any age. Generally, adult cats are more resistant because they have been previously vaccinated against panleukopenia or developed their own immunity through exposure to the virus in the natural environment. Studies have indicated cats that have received the appropriate vaccination series during kittenhood and their first booster as adults have long lasting immunity.

Family Pet Animal Hospital has NOT seen any cases of panleukopenia but will remain vigilant. We will take all necessary precautions with any suspect or high-risk patients (young, unvaccinated, sick, recently adopted from shelters/rescues) coming to the hospital – practicing all the appropriate isolation, disinfection, and handling protocols to minimize risk of spreading the infection.

Again, we reiterate that we believe there is minimal risk to the vast majority of our patients because of their vaccination status and likely natural immunity. However, we wanted to share the information.

Animal Care & Control enlisted the help of PAWS Chicago and other rescue groups in order to save as many lives as possible at the shelter. PAWS Chicago has taken in cats that are not currently sick but may have been exposed to the virus at ACC and are looking for potential foster homes. If you DO NOT have cats in your home and would like to foster, contact PAWS Chicago.

BREAKING NEWS on the Canine Influenza Outbreak

This latest statement from Family Pet Animal Hospital was issued via email to our clients on 4/13/15


Important Update on the Canine Influenza Outbreak in Chicago

The doctors and staff at Family Pet Animal Hospital wanted to inform all our clients, both dog and cat owners, about the latest information on the canine inluenza outbreak in the Chicago area. While Family Pet has posted information on our website and social media (Facebook, Twitter, and Google+) during the last few weeks, we are distributing this message via email in an attempt to reach as many of our clients as possible with the latest news.
As most of you are aware, the Chicago area has experienced a huge surge in respiratory infections in our pet canine population in recent weeks. The doctors here at Family Pet Animal Hospital have been working tirelessly to determine the cause and best course of treatment for our pets and the community by working closely with other local veterinary hospitals and veterinary specialists.

The current outbreak had previously been attributed to the H3N8 influenza strain, which was identified in the U.S. dog population back in 2004. However, on Sunday, April 12, 2015, laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin announced they have determined that the influenza outbreak in our area is due to a different strain of the virus than previously assumed. This strain of the virus had not previously been seen in North America. It is closely related to Inluenza A H3N2 viruses, which were identified in 2006 in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations.

For our cat owners, we wanted you to be aware that the H3N2 viruses previously identified and studied in Asia were shown to cause respiratory illness in cats as well. However, there are no current reports of feline respiratory illness here in the U.S. from the strain of virus currently affecting the dog population. At this time, there is no vaccination available for cats. We will continue to provide updates to you as information becomes available.

Additionally, everyone should be aware that, to date, there is NO evidence that the virus can be transmitted to humans.

Symptoms of the virus are persistent, hacking cough, high fever, nasal discharge, lethargy, and inappetence. Because the best defense against contracting the virus is to minimize chances of exposure, we continue to strongly recommend eliminating your dog’s interaction with other dogs – daycare, boarding, training, dog parks, grooming salons, pet stores, and any other area dogs congregate. Please schedule an appointment with your pet’s veterinarian if he or she is displaying these symptoms. Early treatment is important to prevent progression to pneumonia or other serious health problems.

Unfortunately, no one knows whether or not the current influenza vaccine available for dogs (developed for the H3N8 strain) will be effective against the new strain. The canine inluenza vaccine protocol requires a series of two vaccines given two to four weeks apart. It is important to note that any protection offered would not begin until a minimum of four to six weeks from the initial vaccine. For those patients who have received the first vaccine in the series, we absolutely recommend finishing the series.

Given the information we have at this time, the highly contagious nature of the virus, the fact that a handful of dogs have died due to complications of the illness, and because the existing vaccine is the only potential defense available, unless you are able to keep your dog isolated in your home and yard, the doctors at Family Pet Animal Hospital continue to recommend vaccinating your dog. Our hope is that the vaccine may offer some cross protection against the current strain, lessening the symptoms and severity of illness. While the number of cases of respiratory illness we are seeing on a daily basis has begun to decrease in the last few days, we are unable to say how long the outbreak will last.

The press release issued on 4/12/15 from Cornell University is available here:http://mediarelations.cornell.edu/2015/04/12/midwest-canine-influenza-outbreak-caused-by-new-strain-of-virus

Please continue to visit our website and connect with us on social media for the latest updates. We will continue to share any information we have as it becomes available as we are deeply committed to the health of our patients and pets in our community.

Family Pet is a Proud Veterinary Ambassador of the Anti-Cruelty Society

1479746237-1Start off on the right paw for a long and happy life for your your newly adopted pet from the ACS! As a Veterinary Ambassador of the Anti-Cruelty Society (ACS), Family Pet Animal Hospital commits to financially supporting the ACS and to providing special offers to ACS adoptees. Bring your new furry friend into Family Pet (within 90 days of adoption) and receive an exam for $20 and a discount on diagnostic tests and vaccinations performed during that first visit.

See more from the Anti-Cruelty Society’s website:http://www.anticruelty.org/vet-ambass/